Intellectual development for Kids from 4 to 5 years old

Intellectual development for Kids from 4 to 5 years old

Intellectual or cognitive development refers to the acquisition of knowledge, the ability to think creatively, to be attentive, to understand and solve problems, to memorize information and to exercise judgment.

Language

At this age :

Remember that children do not all develop at the same pace in all areas. The information on this website is designed to be general. If your child’s development is worrying you, it is best to consult your doctor.

  • He understands long histories and logical explanations;
  • He anticipates situations, often projects himself into the future or the imaginary, and this is observed in what he says;
  • He uses precise vocabulary words (for example, when he sees a duck, he will use the correct term rather than a more general term like a bird );
  • He is fluent in sentences with more than one conjugated verb and he adequately conjugates the verbs;
  • He pronounces all sounds correctly except perhaps “ch” (as in cat ), “j” (as in juice ) and “r”. He may also have difficulty pronouncing consonant sequences (such as “tr” in the train );
  • He understands time intervals better, for example, the meaning of the words “today,” “tomorrow,” and “yesterday.”

The reasoning skills

At this age :

  • He understands how to sort and classify objects according to their characteristics such as size or color;
  • He is able to place the objects according to a logical sequence (for example, he places a red pearl, two green pearls, a red pearl, two green pearls on a necklace) and thus begins to master basic mathematical concepts;
  • He likes games where objects have to be associated;
  • He recognizes and knows how to name what is bigger, bigger, smaller, and smaller;
  • He recognizes more and more the different colors and he is able to name them precisely;
  • It reproduces the motifs, the sequences, and the order;
  • He can put the steps of a story in order by following the chronology of events;
  • He understands the order of numbers;
  • He becomes aware of his learning with the support of the adult and feels a pride that leads him to persevere on the cognitive level. For example, he tries to find different ways to answer his questions or new solutions to a problem.

Language

Over the next few months, he will begin to:

  • Use the words “yesterday” and “tomorrow” correctly, accompanying them with good tenses (past or future);
  • Recognize sounds in words (for example, “a” in airplane).

The reasoning skills

Over the next few months, he will begin to:

  • Understand the concepts of texture, weight, position, and space;
  • Count small sets of objects (for example, between 0 and 10);
  • Understand different forms of measurement (weight, size, and length);
  • Plan and build with simple tools.  For example, he will plan the construction of a tower by selecting blocks of wood and determining the number of floors required.

How to help it progress?

Your child has a unique personality and he develops at his own pace. But you can help foster this development by putting into practice the Comfort, Play and Teach parenting approach. This approach has been designed to integrate easily into your daily routine. Adapted to the current age of your child, the table below gives you examples of small gestures beneficial to his intellectual development.

Comfort

When you read him storybooks without illustrations, your child loves these moments in your company and the opportunity to use your imagination and perfect your vocabulary and ability to understand a text.

When you encourage him to speak by asking him open-ended questions, for example, “how is this possible? Or “why do you think that …? ” Your child exercises reasoning skills while thinking about cause and effect.

To play

When you give him simple problems to solve, for example by asking him “what different sounds can you do with your body (fingers, feet, mouth, etc.)?” Your child uses his creativity to get there and uses his imagination.

When you create a card game to memorize using your interests, for example, cars or dinosaurs,
your child learns to recognize things that are the same and different.

Teach

When using household objects or foods to make simple additions and subtractions, for example by asking “if I have 3 apples and I eat 1, how much do I have left?” Your child begins to understand the notions of “plus” and “minus”, and explores the basics of calculus.

When you emphasize the words he sees every day, for example, those on the stop signs, the labels of cereal boxes and milk cartons, and the “attention, naughty dog” signs, your child sees the link between spoken words and written words.

Read more: What is the best educational toys for children according to their age

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